Tag Archives: Race

Dear NHL: This Isn’t Your Fight But It’s Time to Take a Stand

JT Brown

Through most of my life I have held the opinion that hockey players are a different breed of athlete, and for the most part, I have viewed this as positive thing. They’re down-to-earth mostly small town boys who live, sleep, and breathe the sport that they love. The only thing important to them is hockey, and that’s fine, except when there are more important things.

This past week I have found myself feeling a deep disappointment in the NHL with their stance of ‘not taking a stance’ in the fight that The President of the United States seems to be waging with the world of professional sport. I keep waiting for some sort of sign that someone, the players, the coaches, the owners, the players association, the commissioner of the league, will stand alongside members of the NFL, NBA, WNBA and the MLB.

This past weekend however, J.T Brown became the first player in the NHL to protest raising a fist during the anthem. It was a dignified act, one that Brown defended in a statement, and an act of extreme bravery. He’s all alone.

Brown’s act sheds light on the dark side of racism that exists in a league that is over 93% white with a fan base that is also largely white. After Hockey Night in Canada tweeted a photo of Brown’s protest I was appalled and disgusted to see that a majority of the responses were negative and disparaging. Brown himself has come out mentioning the death threats he’s received in the wake of Saturday night.

These protests that have been sweeping the sports world, they’re not about the flag, or the anthem, or the military. They are about police brutality and racial injustice that are rampant in the United States. The response to Brown is just another display of why these protests are necessary, and that Canada is not exempt from the racial biases that permeate the world of professional sports. Even while members of the Tampa Bay Lightning have stated they “have his back,” the support seems halfhearted at best and no one has outright condemned death threats. It’s also interesting that Brown didn’t play Monday night.

Now I get it, the league is made up of predominately white, non-American, affluent, cis-gender men, who are so far removed from the racial issues that Colin Kaepernick first started kneeling for. As a white Canadian cis-gendered female, I am also an outsider, but sport, specifically hockey has played an important role in my life and I believe we can do better.

As white people we need to be better allies. At the 1968 Olympic Games Peter Norman stood beside Tommie Smith and John Carlos in support of fundamental human rights. He didn’t raise his fist, it wasn’t his fight, but he did say “I’ll stand by you” and wore a badge supporting the Olympic Project For Human Rights. Norman faced backlash for his support. NHL players need to look around themselves at what is happening off the ice, to their compatriots in the league and in other sports and say “I’ll stand by you,” and it needs to start at the top.

Gary Bettman needs to stop being such a weiner, and the owner of the Pittsburgh Penguins needs to stop kowtowing to The President. The decision of the Pittsburgh Penguins to attend the white house today is disgraceful because it gives Trump a win. Gary Bettman has often maintained that he would prefer that his players be apolitical. In this Trumpian era however, there is no neutrality anymore and Crosby defending his team’s decision to attend the White House calling it a great honour, is just about as political as you can get.

The Penguins, and the NHL as a whole is trying to act as though everything is “business as usual.” This speaks to the underlying privilege that most NHL players are ingrained with. In a league that is 90% white and 75% non-American, the NHL has tried to stay out of it and “stick to hockey.” Not so fast. (I will also point out the hypocrisy of the Calgary Flames endorsing a mayoral candidate).

The NHL likes to talk a big game with their “Hockey is for Everyone” campaigns, and yet when the players, owners, and coaches have an actual chance to show the young people they are trying to inspire that they care about them, they can’t. The NHL is being pulled into a situation that they are uncomfortable with but they’re going to have to learn how to deal with it.

I don’t know how many more hockey player’s we’re going to see protesting but white men in a position of privilege and power need to do better to stand behind their teammates who take a stand. It’s time to realize that sports cannot always be apolitical and there are in fact times when they are forced to become so. Trying to stay out of it sends the wrong message to fans and members of the sport community.

The President and now his Vice President have made it abundantly clear that they are not going to let this issue die. They will continue to try and divide their country by using sport, something that should be a unifying influence. While the NHL would prefer to ignore what is happening, it’s difficult to try and stay neutral when there is only one side.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche – Americanah (2013)

americanahI don’t think there are enough words to accurately describe how much I loved this book. I wasn’t familiar with Ngozi Adiche until I heard about this novel and now I cannot wait to read more of her work.

Essentially Americanah tells the story of Ifemelu and Obinze who are young and in love when they leave their home in Nigeria and head west. While Ifemelu ends up in America, Obinze, finding post 9/11 America closed to him, takes up a dangerous life in London as an undocumented immigrant. While the story is about the relationship between these two characters, Ifemelu’s journey is by far the more compelling.

The story of Obinze sheds important light on racism and the danger that undocumented immigrants live in every day, but the plot involving Ifemelu, who is despite her academic success is forced to grapple with what it means to be black, is by far the most important part of this novel.

The title itself refers to Ifelemu’s journey from Nigeria, to the hallowed halls of Princeton, and back. Once back in Nigeria she looks at everything through the eyes of an American leading her friend to call her an Americanah.

Ngozi Adiche grapples with the issues of race, love, and identity in such a brilliant and beautifully written way, grasping the nuance often involved with tackling such issues. As an African Americna female herself, she is probably able to draw on her own experiences to make this novel as rich as it is. I really don’t have much else to say, this was definitely one the best books I’ve read all year.

Gelnn C. Altschuler – All Shook Up (2003)

AllShookUpLooking at how Rock ‘N Roll changed the world, Glenn C. Altschuler, in his book, focuses exclusively on the 1950s, the decade in which he deems Rock N’ Roll music was born. I think that he is correct in this assessment, although I did have some issues with his narrow view.

This is a relatively compact read. Each chapter tackles a different social issue including race, sexuality, and the generational gap. He writes that Rock ‘N Roll entered directly into Cold War controversies ongoing at the time and appealed to the new generation of baby boomers growing up in America. I enjoyed his discussions of various musical personalities including Elvis and Perry Como, to inspirational artists like Fats Domino and Willie Mae Thornton. Even though Altschuler talks about how Rock ‘N Roll was both a form of sexual expression and sexual control, he doesn’t explicitly tackle the nuances of gender. How Rock ‘N Roll was a heavily male dominated sphere and women could only enter into it by playing virginal maids, a la Diana Ross and the Supremes. He briefly mentions the Ronettes, but says nothing about the backlash that occurred over the lyrics to “Be My Baby”

I do think that the 1950s may have been the most important decade for Rock ‘N Roll, but I also wish that Altschuler had extended his range past the 1950s and into the 60s, 70s, and beyond. Even though the Rock ‘N Roll’s formative years may have ended, it certainly did not and continued, as it continues today, to be a vehicle for protest and social change.