Tag Archives: United States

Ken Follett – Edge of Eternity (2014)

EdgeOfEternitySo mixed regarding how I feel about this book. I liked it, but I liked it because I like the history behind it, not because I think Ken Follett is a good writer.

This is the third book in Follett’s trilogy and for me, after the first one, they kind of went downhill. The first book was great, the characters were somewhat original and the idea of tracing five different families through the First World War was compelling and done well. The second book was OK, but I think its harder to write about the Second World War without falling into the same tired clichés and character types.

I heard a rumour that Follett didn’t even want to write this book, and it really showed. He started off strong telling the story of a young Black lawyer on a Freedom Ride through the Southern United States, and his chapter detailing the events of JFK’s assassination was done really well, as you see how every character stationed in different areas around the world reacts to the news. He should have just ended there, but obviously couldn’t, needing to tie up everyone’s stories with the Fall of the Berlin Wall in 1991.

Following the JFK assassination the book becomes almost unbearable, the dialogue is so banal and so many of the events are just unbelievable. It makes me wonder if Follett himself has ever actually experienced anything! I’ve written before about how I don’t like his female characters as they all come off as very one-dimensional, and this book was no different. The female characters all serve the goals of the men, and none of them have their own interesting storylines.

Despite the fact that I did not love this book, for some reason I still cried during the epilogue when Follett describes the African American family, the family of the Freedom Rider protagonist, sitting around a TV watching was Barak Obama is sworn into office. That’s more about me being a suck though, than Follett’s writing, as overall, the book was not memorable.

Hillary Clinton – Hard Choices (2014)

hard-choicesI finished reading this just as Hillary Clinton announced her bid for the 2016 Presidential election. While I am thrilled with Hillary’s announcement and wish her all the best, her book, published last year, was clearly meant as a means to this end.

I hate political memoirs, I just find that there is something so disingenuous about them. They lack the passion that I hope to find in my reading and I normally avoid them at all costs. I made the exception here because A) I do admire Hillary Clinton a great deal, and B) She was doing a book signing at the Indigo around the corner so I had to buy the book.

Essentially the book serves as a way for Hillary to talk about, and justify, all the Hard Choices she had to make while Secretary of State. There were parts where her humour and passion come out, such as when talking about her friendships with various European leaders, (she talks about Nikolai Sarkozy as though he is her gay best friend), and the close bond she established with Aung San Suu Kyi, the Burmese opposition politician and human rights activist.

In addition the chapters spent talking about human rights, specifically for women and girls around the world were the most enjoyable as these are clearly causes that Clinton cares about. While the book had its shining moments, overall it was quite boring; just another political memoir to add in a candidate’s bid for Presidency.

Susan Jane Gilman – The Ice Cream Queen of Orchard Street (2014)

IceCreamQueenEvery once and a while a book comes along that catches you off guard with how good it is. This book was like that for me. Unfortunatley, as many others have already stated, the book suffers from “chick-lit cover syndrome,” that is many are unlikely to pick it us since it features a pair of yellow high heels and an ice cream cone.

The book focuses on Lillian Dunkle from her youth as a Jewish immigrant living in a New York tenement up to her life as a successful ice cream magnate. Lillian is run over by a horse as a girl and taken in by an Italian family where she learns to make ice cream. Through will and determination Lillian makes a name for herself and shows herself to be a shrewd, and sometimes merciless businesswoman. This is a classic rags-to-riches story but it focuses on a woman, and the world that she had to survive in to reach the top.

I loved the character of Lillian. Even though she is a crippled at a young age, she’s not a sympathetic character. Nor is she incredibly likeable. She is not described as pretty or kind in any way, and contains none of the traits found in your typical female protagonist. Instead she is clever and smart, knowing her weaknesses which she plays to her advantage. There is something inherent in Lillian however, that you can’t help admire, even if you don’t particularly like her. I especially loved that fact that she married Bert, a good looking, kind hearted man who many see as “way out of her league,” without having to justify it. I was worried that the author was going to do something like make Bert gay, and have Lillian act as his beard, but he genuinely loved his wife and found in her the characteristics that we as readers also fell in love with.

This story is the history of so-many things. It’s the history of the immigrant experience in America, it is the history of the New York’s Lower East Side, it is a history of America itself starting driving through both World Wars, the Depression, Communist witch-hunts, the nuclear families of the fifties, the psychedelic sixties and seventies, and all the trends that accompanied it. It is also a history of ice cream providing interesting pieces of information peppered throughout. I absolutely loved this book, but be warned, reading will make you want to eat ice cream.

Rating 4.5/5