Tag Archives: Year in Review

2017: The Year I Learned About Self Care

This time in between Christmas and New Years in always a time for self reflection and for self care. It took me a few years to full grasp on to this idea of self care. I had viewed it as more of a “treat yo’ self” kind of thing where women go get their nails done and sit at home surrounded by candles eating full fat ice cream watching You’ve Got Mail. While pampering yourself is definitely an aspect of self care the term means so much more.

It hit home for me this year with the endless news cycle of 2017. Everyday it was more about what Trump was doing, or about the endless number of women who endured harassment and abuse at the hands of powerful men. Self care means different things to different people but for me it started to make sense when I finally turned off the news.

The goal was to stay informed but not inundated by depressing stories after depressing stories. I would check my news outlets in the morning, take a quick scroll through twitter and then that was it. No more reading endless articles from Jezebel about why I should be outraged at the world. I was less exhausted and unplugging became part of my self care routine.

Depression and anxiety are two things I’ve struggled with, although it’s not something I have always been forthcoming about or willing to admit. Rough patches and mental breakdowns in grad school weren’t always met with the understanding I needed from those around me and therefore I began to see it as a weakness. It’s not, and there’s nothing wrong with needing a break.

I realized that the stress of grad school, as well as the stress my relationship at the time was causing, meant I had less time to do some of the things I had worked into my routine during undergrad and high school. Things like reading and writing for myself which I didn’t even realize I missed doing until I wasn’t doing them anymore.

As my relationship was on the way out and I started a new graduate program, one that was still a lot of work but much less pressure, I found the time to get back into the things that I loved. I even picked up new hobbies, specifically knitting. Working with my hands is calming and soothing for me and I began to use knitting as a way to centre myself and heal.

As I look to the year ahead I’m going to try and do more things that bring me joy. I’m going to try and be better at keeping up this blog as I branch out from writing exclusively about book reviews and try to open myself up a bit more. I’m going to try to work meditation practices into my knitting, and I’m going to continue to be mindful of the effect that the endless news cycle is having on me.

I thank everyone who has followed this blog for years and am excited about this coming year. So let me know, what is your self care routine? And how do you plan to take care of yourself heading into the New Year?

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Best of 2015

Hi everyone,
After a long, (very long) hiatus due to technical difficulties I’m back with my list of the best books I read this year. I was trying to pick five, but just couldn’t narrow it down so there are 6 books on here. While I was trying to read 100 books in 2015 I only made it to 99 (so frustrating, but oh well), and so here I present to you my 6 favourite books that I read this year.

Jennifer Egan – A Visit From the Goon Squad
This was a great book because while it is a collection of short stories that can all be read individually, they are all still connected. Through her writing, Egan follows the lives of characters involved in the New York music scene from the 1960s to the present day. While exploring the obvious themes of “sex, drugs, and rock n’ roll,” Egan also asks the question of what does it mean to be happy? It is a question that is so fundamental to human existence and Egan’s book has the ability to speak to any audience.

David Sax – The Tastemakers
I’ve always been a huge fan of food writing and David Sax’s The Tastemakers did not disappoint. Exploring the world of master chefs and artisans bakeries Sax looks at how a food becomes a “trend” and traces the life cycle of food trends from their inception to their popularity and eventually their demise (RIP Fondue of the 70s). He draws really interesting connections (like connecting the rise of cupcakes 9/11) and writes in an interesting and accessible way. If you love food, I highly recommend this.

Rebecca Solnit – Men Explain Things To Me
As much as I enjoyed Roxanne Gay’s Bad Feminist and Lena Dunham’s Not That Kind of GirlMen Explain Things To Me, just spoke more to me, especially the titular essay. There is no denying that Rebecca Solnit is brilliant, and in her essays she exposes the ways that sexism can manifest itself in subtle ways. This essay gave rise to the term “mansplaining” which has become a part of our vocabulary. This year was a good year for women, but things like the attacks on planned parenthood or all the reports of workplace discrimination remind us how far we have to go. This collection of essays is important and well worth it.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche – Americanah 
As another notable feminist, Adiche gained notoriety this year for her TedTalk and subsequent publication Why We Should All Be Feminist. I chose to read this novel because I was unfamiliar with her work and am always a fan of a “fish out of water” story. Americanah follows Ifemelu and Obinze when they are young and in love in Nigeria and follows their respective immigrant experiences. This books was so much more than just an immigrant story, it was a story about love, between two people, between people and their country, and between the people we were and the people we’ve become. Adiche explores important questions about what it means to belong and the ideas we have surrounding identity. This novel made me laugh and cry, it broke my heart and caused me to reexamine my own life. It is powerful and thought provoking and wholly, totally, amazing.

Lev Grossman – The Magicians (Review Forthcoming)
This is kind of cheating because this is a trilogy as opposed to a single book, but I loved the whole thing. It’s fantasy without being fantastic; wondrous without being wonderful. Its a critique on established fantasy (Harry Potter, Chronicles of Narnia, Lord of the Rings) while also establishing itself as its own fantasy series, worthy of its own upcoming Showcase series. Essentially Grossman wants the reader to realize that not all problems can simply be solved my magic, and sometimes magic creates more problems than it solves. Imagine Harry Potter as an incredibly angsty and bored teenager (a la Holden Caulfield, not book 5 Harry) who gets sucked into a twisted dark version of Narnia and you have The Magicians. 

Aziz Ansari – Modern Romance (Review Forthcoming)
I LOVE Aziz Ansari, and my respect and admiration for him only grew after reading this book. To be completely honest I bought this book knowing nothing about it thinking it was just going to be another bio along the same lines as Bossypants or Yes Please. NOPE! Ansari teamed up with a social psychologist to write a non fiction, but still hilarious book about dating in the modern age. He explores how technology (Tinder, OkC, etc) has affected the way we meet people and fall in love and compares the dating cultures in different cultures. It was funny, smart, so interested, and actually relatable. There’s a lot of overlap between this book and Ansari’s netflix specials (Live at Madison Square Garden as well as Master of None), but it’s not too much so that it gets boring over overdone. Ansari is smart and he’s using his platform as a stand up comedian to talk about issues that he feels are important. The book is great and I can’t recommend it enough.